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Bank of England Museum

The Bank of England on its historic site and its Bank of England Museum

Bank of England Museum
Bank of England Museum

 

The Bank of England Museum can be found on the side road of Threadneedle Street in Bartholomew Lane. The Bank of England is the grand building see below that stands opposite the Royal Exchange in  Threadneedle Street. The Doorway above in Bartholomew Lane is the discreet entrance to the Bank of England Museum. It was opened in 1988 by Queen Elizabeth II.

 

Bank of England facing the christmas tree outside the Royal Exchange
Bank of England facing the Christmas tree outside the Royal Exchange

 

The Museum itself is free, and there is a bag scan policy, free audio guide when we attended. Taking photos is allowed. They had activity sheets for children graded by age group when it was holiday time and seem to have different things throughout the year check at the welcome desk. The Free map colour codes the sections of the museum we have made them into subheadings below.

Bank of England Museum Bartholemew Lane
Bank of England Museum Bartholomew Lane

 

Old Soane’s Bank and it’s Fortune

The Bank of England has a two-part history to its structure. Originally it was designed over many years in stages by the Banks Surveyor, Sir John Soane. This project ran into decades, between 1788 – 1833. It always remained on this site in Threadneedle Street, where it is today. Most of this complex structure was demolished in the mid-1920s and later looked back on as one of those moments in history that suffered a loss of a great building, and an architectural showcase of works by one of the masters. Artworks of the structure can be found inside the museum. It is well worth listening to the Audio description and visiting the historical artworks. One such artwork is described as being a pie with the lid taken off. Its all bought to life when you see what was and what is. Also the touches of Soanes that still live on.

1925-1939 saw the second build phase take place, by Architect Sir Herbert Baker.

The Bank’s Stock Office section of the Museum

Is designed to emulate the 18th C style of how the bank would have looked to customers collecting their dividends.

Emulation of open Fire places Bank of England had, in the Bank of England Museum
Emulation of open Fireplaces Bank of England had, in the Bank of England Museum

 

Middle of this room is a large domed roof, it is thought to emulate Soanes Designs that he used in the original building

Domed Roof Bank of England Stock Office section
Domed Roof Bank of England Stock Office section

 

Directly under usually the interactive area that can take on themes come school holiday time. around the left-hand side history documents and artworks in cabinets. On the right-hand side coin collections arranged by years and sovereign.  The Shop is on the right-hand side corner as you enter this first large room. The back corner on this occasion had the temporary exhibition “Financing the First World War”.

 

Bank of England historic style counter lamps
Bank of England historic style counter lamps
Bank of England Museum Wooden counters and lamps
Bank of England Museum Wooden counters and lamps

 

The Bank of England had luxurious wooden counter tops and a less expensive wood for the surfaced that point towards the public, to distinguish a status divide between giver and receiver, host and service user.

Temporary Exhibition Financing the First World War

Bank of England Museum Financing the First World War
Bank of England Museum Financing the First World War

Bank of England onsite Shop

Gift shop Items Bank of England Museum
Gift shop Items Bank of England Museum
Gift shop Items Bank of England Museum
Gift shop Items Bank of England Museum
Giftshop gold bar box shaped money box items Bank of England Museum
Giftshop gold bar box-shaped money box items Bank of England Museum

 

 

The Early Years 1694-1800 Section of the Museum

 

Bank of England Early Years
Bank of England Early Years
Bank of England Early Years
Bank of England Early Years
The Eearly Years Section Bank of England Museum
The Early Years Section Bank of England Museum

 

This Iron trunk if you look at it, you will soon discover it is one of the oldest items in the museum. From 1700. Its metal embellishment work features animals and swirls. It was used in the artwork of the 1994 £50 note that continuous pattern that runs along the bottom edge.  Notes can be seen inside the Museum. As there are rules and regs about photographing sterling notes. The information said it was mentioned in a book 1735 “The great iron chest in the parlour.”

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The Rotunda 1800- 1946 Section of the Museum

Rotunda Roof Bank of England Museum
Rotunda Roof Bank of England Museum

 

Current Exhibition “Feliks Topolski: Drawing Debden

The Museum has a printed out leaflet about this exhibition as well as some complementary postcards with artworks on.

In Summary, although this is hard because there are so many things to include. The Bank of England printing works opened for business in Debden 1956 Essex. St Lukes Printing works in Old St had been the previous site. Now things were able to be all completed in one large area and so more efficient. Creating the artwork engravings right down to the finished banknote was a series of stages that a team of people created. In 1957  Topolski was commissioned to illustrate the new printing process, In short, this exhibition showcases this artwork.

Who was Topolski?

Eastern European classic sounding name Feliks Topolski was indeed from Poland 1907-1989.

Mr Topolski was a member of the Royal Academy and came to the UK around the mid-1930s.  He was a WW2 artist for both the UK and his native land. Illustrated pieces for the “News Chronicle, Illustrated London News.” Commissioned to illustrate for the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II. From 1953 he created his own news publication, “Topolski Chronicle”, which carried on into the early 1980s. The Rich and famous he illustrated, as well as creating some pieces for the BBC. He captured live incidents.

How did the Bank of England find Topolski?

It was Topolski’s work during WW2 Blitz in London that bought the connection to the Bank of England,  since this area was also bombed circa 1941. The massive crater in the road photographed by bank station and the royal exchange is one of the most iconic London Blitz moments in time that many people recall seeing. Topolski illustrated this scene but it was withdrawn from publication.

Visit the Museum to find out the story

Without wanting to retell the exhibition or their fantastic information you can find out why, and why the Bank of England not only purchased Topolski’s artwork but also later asked him to record by illustrating their print works. This was in a time when checking and accuracy were all done by humans in volume and speed. Topolski captured not only a time that technology overtook, but a process that was complex and security and diligence was of the utmost.

 

Rotunda Gallery Area Bank of England Museum
Rotunda Gallery Area Bank of England Museum

 

Initially one may not understand the scribbles and flows, in order to capture what the artist noticed, stand back from the artwork, study it like a bank note. This enables a whole impression of these different characters frozen in a moment of time and history.

Topolski close up artwork Bank of England Museum
Topolski close up artwork Bank of England Museum
Topolski info Bank of England Museum Rotunda
Topolski info Bank of England Museum Rotunda
Rotunda cabinets and statues Bank of England Museum
Rotunda cabinets and statues Bank of England Museum

 

Wind in the Willows Section of the Rotunda area.

Kenneth Grahame 1859-1932 – Author of Wind in the Willows, had a day job, working for the Bank of England as the Secretary.  This delightful permanent display cabinet showing some of the animal characters from the book. His resignation letter and other artefacts also are on display, because they tell a story in itself, about his time at the Bank after 30 yrs of service. Kenneth took Early retirement from the bank in 1908. The book ” Wind in the Willows”  was published that same year. Grahame had written in his spare time, with the inclusion of shorter articles for other publications.

Main Characters were Mole, Rat, Mr Toad, Mr Badger.

Wind in the Willows section Bank of England Museum
Wind in the Willows section Bank of England Museum

 

Gold Bars

 

Each bar weights 12.5kg. In Imperial measurements,  400-438 oz also known as a Troy Ounce or Fine Ounce approx 28lbs, 2 stone! The Treasury stores gold at the Bank of England approx 9.9mn FOZ of Gold.

 

 

Gold bar Bank of England Museum
Gold bar Bank of England Museum
Lift a gold bar special cabinet to let the public have a feel at how heavy a gold bar is
Lift a gold bar special cabinet to let the public have a feel at how heavy a gold bar is
Lift a gold bar special cabinet to let the public have a feel at how heavy a gold bar is
Lift a gold bar special cabinet to let the public have a feel at how heavy a gold bar is
You are on CCTV Gold bar lifting cabinet experience
You are on CCTV Gold bar lifting cabinet experience

The Bank Note Gallery Section of the Museum

 

BankNote Gallery Bank of England Museum
BankNote Gallery Bank of England Museum

The Modern Economy 1946-Present Section of the Museum

Interactive Screens and artefacts about the modern notes and processing.

 

Where is the Bank of England

 

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