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Kew Gardens Autumn

Kew Gardens Autumn Palm House
Kew Gardens Autumn Palm House

Kew Gardens in Autumn

 

As Daylight hours shorten,it is nice to get outside and see the leaves change colours before the landscape changes as winter approaches.

Kew Gardens were setting up their Winter experience in the gardens as we were walking around, a lot of preparation and treats are planned for Christmas at Kew.

The first thing you notice is a lot more lights are being placed around which will illuminate trees, buildings and pathways.

Red orange autumn leaf tree Kew Gardens
Red-orange autumn leaf tree Kew Gardens Autumn

 

The crisp Autumn morning air, the quietness as we walked along the pathway that had these fabulous suspended Glitterballs from the yellow leave trees. The confetti of leaves enchanting.

Tree suspended Glitter balls Kew Gardens Autumn
Tree suspended Glitter balls Kew Gardens Autumn

 

Kew Gardens Autumn Tree hanging glitterball
Kew Gardens Autumn Tree hanging glitterball

 

The water by the Sackler crossing bridge was stunning with the Christmas decorations floating, which will light up in the dark. They looked like stars or little paper folded boats.

Kew Gardens Christmas Decorations floating in the lake by the Sackler Crossing
Kew Gardens Christmas Decorations floating in the lake by the Sackler Crossing

 

A lot of interesting birds to spot, one could make a whole post of the birds you can see at Kew Gardens.

Birds at Kew Gardens on the Sackler Crossing by the water
Birds at Kew Gardens on the Sackler Crossing by the water

 

TreeTop  Walkway

This is 200 meters long and 18 meters above ground.

There are a set of steps, approx 118 to walk up to the high rise platform, and a lift although the lift was not working on one of our visits check the website or contact in advance. 6 people can go in the lift. Prams have to stay on the ground. Children must be supervised and we would not suggest running or causing impacts it is not a climbing frame or playground feature.

Also in bad stormy weather, the TreeTop walkway may not be open to visitors, check the website. Although it is not that high, some may feel the minor sway of the walkway because it was designed to flow and flex with the trees so as to not damage them.

People with challenges around heights, slight movement, balance issues, dizzy spells, vertigo.

We mention this in case this sensation is not suitable for you. The only good thing about the progressive stairs is that people can try the incline and turn back when it is too much. Rather than taking a lift straight to the top.  The view even from managing to reach part way up the stairs is an option. We know even some images of heights or Tv can affect people or look up at heigh items. Also, some people can be fine on a mountain but feel unease on a boat or bridge everyone is different.  We give a photo of the view looking up at the structure, and down, from TreeTop Walkway further down, next 4  images.

 

 

Tree Tops walkway Kew Gardens
Tree Top walkway Kew Gardens

 

The layout of the walkway is inspired by the natural patterns found in nature known as the Fibonacci sequence, if you took a bird’s eye view of the ring circuit it would blend in with natures structures.

Here is an image looking up at the structure, organic and somewhat futuristic.

Looking up at TreeTop Walkway Kew Gardens
Looking up at TreeTop Walkway Kew Gardens

 

 

From the side view whilst walking around TreeTop Walkway Kew Gardens
From the side view whilst walking around TreeTop Walkway Kew Gardens

 

Treetop Walkway Kew Gardens
Treetop Walkway Kew Gardens

 

View from TreeTop Walkway looking down on the Temperate House below

 

View from TreeTop Walkway Kew Gardens looking down on Temperate House below
View from TreeTop Walkway Kew Gardens looking down on Temperate House below

 

Kew Palace closed for the winter

Stunning red-orange brickwork matching the foliage of the trees and almost camouflaged by it. This is closed during the winter but normally open to visitors as part of the entry cost.

kew Palace Closed for the Winter red tree foliage blends with the red brickwork
Kew Palace Closed for the Winter red tree foliage blends with the red brickwork

 

Beautiful yellow leaves ginkgo trees almost like a confetti of cornflakes

 

Yellow leaves Gingo trees Kew Gardens Autumn
Yellow leaves Gingo trees Kew Gardens Autumn

 

Yellow Leaves Gingo tree Kew Gardens Autumn
Yellow Leaves Gingo tree Kew Gardens Autumn

 

 

Bigger than it looks giant domed Toadstool

giant toadstool dome Kew Gardens white with circular patterns of little brown semi circle flecks
giant toadstool dome Kew Gardens.

 

Red leaves reach for the sky Kew Gardens Autumn
Red leaves reach for the sky Kew Gardens Autumn

 

The Great Pagoda completed in 1762

Closed for the Winter reopens April, but this provides a mystical oriental presence to the vista space. The Chinese build their Pagoda’s with an uneven amount of floors. Kew’s Pagoda has 10 floors and is in the shape of an octagon. Approximately 50 meters tall, and some 30cm slightly smaller on each level so it gets smaller towards the top by graduation. Garden Follies ornaments that borrow styles from other parts of history or cultures especially oriental, were very popular in the past. This was a gift to Princess Augusta, who was the main force behind opening Kew Gardens to the public.

The Great Pergoda Autumn Kew Gardens. Completed 1762
The Great Pagoda Autumn Kew Gardens. Completed 1762

 

Paper Bark Maple – Acer griseum. Creates a circular blanket of confetti that was beautiful

Paper Bark Maple Acer griseum Kew Gardens Autumn
Paper Bark Maple Acer griseum Kew Gardens Autumn

 

Commemorative Benches were grown from a Battlefield Acorn

To celebrate World War 1 ending this year as a centenary, Kew has made use of a tree that was part of a battlefield. The Acorn from a sessile Oak Quercus petraea from the battlefield in France of Verdun was collected. This was planted in Kew Gardens in 1919  by the Palm House, in the hope to become a fine tree.  It Grew for 100 years, till destroyed by a storm in October 2013, “St Jude’s Day Storm.” The head of the Tree Arboretum Tony Kirkham pushed the concept of using the wood to make outdoor bench commemorative items. The website shows a different type of bench but suggests more will be made.

The one we saw this autumn was a new addition in a medieval enchanted forest shape.

Commemerative Bench made from a tree that grew from a verdun battlefield Acorn WW1
Commemorative Bench made from a tree that grew from a Verdun battlefield Acorn WW1

 

Commemerative Bench made from a tree that grew from a verdun battlefield Acorn WW1
Commemorative Bench made from a tree that grew from a Verdun battlefield Acorn WW1

 

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Alpine House Autumn colour grasses

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Where is Kew Gardens

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