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Seven Ages of Man totem pole sculpture inspired by shakespeare

Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture
Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture

 

In 1980 this Sculpture was put up, outside a BT building Baynard House in the City of London Borough.

It is based on the Seven Ages of Man poem that William Shakespeare wrote, which was used in the play “As You Like It”. The Artist is Richard Kindersley.

 

Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture
Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture

 

“All the World’s A Stage”, starts the well known Shakespeare monologue that is used in the play “As you like it”.

It can be found in Act II Scene VII and is the part of the melancholy Jaques.

Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture
Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture

 

All the world’s a stage,

And all the men and women merely players;

They have their exits and their entrances;

And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms;
And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school.
Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture
Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture

 

Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture
Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture

 

And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress’ eyebrow.

Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture
Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture

 

Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon’s mouth,

 

Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture
Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture
Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture
Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture

 

And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good capon lined,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances;

Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture
Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture

 

And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slippered pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;

 

Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture
Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture
His youthful hose, well sav’d, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound.

 

Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture
Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture
Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture
Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture
Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture
Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture

 

Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion;
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.
by William Shakespeare 1564–1616

 

Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture
Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture

 

Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture
Artist Richard Kindersley The Seven Ages of Man Sculpture

Other connections inspirations about the 7 ages of man and world stage

It is also thought that the 7 ages of man, fits along with the 7 deadly sins. Juvenal the Roman poet wrote about the whole of Greece being a stage and every Greek an actor. The Play Damon and Pythias written around 1564 by Richard Edwards, made reference to the world being a stage and people playing their parts.  But there are more connections the Latin words quod fere totus Mundus exercet histrionem – mean ” because almost the whole world are actors.”  It was a 12th century saying. It was on a sign at Shakespeares Globe theatre and also has a connection to the Roman courtier Petronius.

Painting 7 ages of man

King Henry the V had a tapestry with the 7 ages of man. An artist by the name of Smirke painted a series of paintings based on the seven ages of man 1798-1801. They consisted of the Infant, Schoolboy, Lover, Soldier, Justice, Pantaloon, Old Age In 1838 another painting the 7 ages of man was created by William Mulready

Location

It can be found on Queen Victoria Street on the way towards BlackFriars.

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